Sorry, we could not find the combination you entered »
Please enter your email and we will send you an email where you can pick a new password.
Reset password:
 

plus

 
Plus Report - By Thomas Baekdal - January 2021

The six sources of COVID-19 misinformation

I have noticed that there has been quite a bit of discussion recently about COVID-19 misinformation and particularly what is causing it. However, I kind of disagree with the way many are talking about this, because the problem is way more complicated than just 'blaming social media'.

If I look back at 2020 as a media analyst, I would characterize the misinformation we have seen as coming from six different sources. And let's explain each one.

Note: This article is part of my series of things we (the press) should change in 2021.

Misinformation from the top

One of the main sources of misinformation has come 'from the top', meaning it has come from political leaders, prime ministers, presidents, and government healthcare administrators.

The misinformation we have seen here is based on three different things.

First, we have seen how country leaders have intentionally misinformed the public to hide their own failures. Some countries have been worse than others in this regard.

Secondly, we have seen how health officials/ministers have provided inaccurate and misleading guidance because they were protecting something else. Sometimes this wasn't done with malice. Sometimes it was just to try to manage the crisis with whatever limited resources were available at the time.

For instance, here in Denmark, we saw a perfect example of this back in March 2020. Back then, the country of Denmark (like so many others) was running out of masks, and we were desperately trying to order more to keep our healthcare workers safe.

 
This 29 page report is exclusive for subscribers. (login)

Try it free for one week

Register to try out Baekdal Plus completely for free for one week.

Subscribe
for just...
$9
MONTH
Subscribe
for just...
$99
YEAR
You get one month for free

 

Baekdal Plus is your premium destination for trends and analysis for the media industry. Every year you get 25 reports about the future media trends, business and editorial strategies, monetization analysis and insights about how to use analytics specifically for publishers.

As a subscriber, you also get full access to all the Plus reports (more than 200) published over the past 8 years, as well as the ability to share what you read.

I'm a company, can we pay via an invoice?

Yes, of course, please write to plus@baekdal.com and I will send you a regular invoice that you can pay via your bank. I will need your company name, address and VAT number (if within the EU). Also, please note that due to this process being manual, this will be for an annual subscription only.

Is there an Enterprise Plan?

Yes, please write to plus@baekdal.com for details. But for 25-99 users: the price is 20% off the subscription price ($79/year per user), 100+ users is a fixed price at $5,000 (for all combined).

Can you create a report just for us?

Yes, please head over to Baekdal Media to read about consulting where I can help you with strategy reviews, trend and strategy reports, and strategic guidance for you media company or a specific publication.

 

 
 
 

The Baekdal Plus Newsletter is the best way to be notified about the latest media reports, but it also comes with extra insights.

Get the newsletter

Thomas Baekdal

Founder, media analyst, author, and publisher. Follow on Twitter

"Thomas Baekdal is one of Scandinavia's most sought-after experts in the digitization of media companies. He has made ​​himself known for his analysis of how digitization has changed the way we consume media."
Swedish business magazine, Resumé

 

—   strategy   —

plus

strategy:
The future of advertising for publishers is first-party data

plus

strategy:
A publishers' guide to listening to your audience

plus

strategy:
The six sources of COVID-19 misinformation

free

strategy:
What the heck happened in the US?!?!

plus

strategy:
What is stopping women from leading the way to the future of independent media?

plus

strategy:
COVID, elections, and the problem with an adversarial press